Archive | Baking RSS feed for this section

Soaked Coffee and Walnut cake

7 Sep

wpid-IMG_20130812_174323.jpgNow, I must emphasise here that this is dedicated to my aunty Lynne. I had been meaning to make my coffee and walnut cake when she visioned for a good year or more (I know, bad niece). Anyway I finally made and and I would say it was definitely worth the wait eh 😉

I used a classic all in one method by Delia Smith, then created a coffee syrup to pour over the two sandwich cakes as soon as they came out of the oven. When they’re still warm, it soaks into the sponge and is deeelishhhh. It was finished off with an indulgent coffee buttercream.

Ingredients:

220g Self raising flour
220g Butter, soft
200g Golden castor sugar
60g Walnuts, roughly chopped
1.5 tbsp Instant coffee mixed with 1 dessertspoon boiling water
4 Eggs
2tsp Baking powder

For the buttercream and syrup:
200g Icing sugar
125g Butter
35gSugar
1tbsp Instant coffee

Method:
1. Cream the butter and sugar together with an electric whisk until the sugar starts to integrate itself into the butter and it’s looking nice and creamy. Add all the dry ingredients and eggs and whisk to combine. Add the walnuts and coffee and whisk briefly to combine.

2. Pour the mixture into two greased and lined baking tins (a lot easier than into one and having to cut the cake in half!) and bake for approx 30mins at 180C.

3. Just before the cake is ready, make the syrup by dissolving the sugar and coffee with 45ml boiling water in a heatproof jug. Pour over equally when the cake is still in the tin pretty soon after it comes out of the oven (it will soak up a lot better)

4. Once cooled, make the buttercream by combining all ingredients and spread with a large knife. Decorate with a few walnut halves and enjoy for a pudding or an indulgent afternoon (or morning) tea.

wpid-IMG_20130811_142326.jpg

wpid-IMG_20130812_174453.jpg

Advertisements

The Best Key Lime Pie ever

5 Aug

This recipe caught my eye ever since Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood claimed it was the best thing they’d ever tasted in three series of the Great British Bake Of. Well, it was about time I tried it!

It’s not the quickest dessert by any means but if you’ve got an afternoon to spare and are craving a bake that will last all week, look no further. This is a great pie, lots of flavour and zingyness, a perfect after dinner treat!

You are only  required to use a few of the left over egg whites for the meringues, but don’t be wasteful – use them all up! I managed to get a pavlova base as well as a load more meringue nests out of the leftovers to freeze. As I didn’t have a blowtorch, I also piped my meringues onto a baking tray and baked them in a low oven the conventional way

Recipe is from the Great British Bake off Showstoppers book

Ingredients

For the sweet ginger pastry image
For the lime filling

Method

  1. For the sweet ginger pastry, sift the flour, icing sugar, ground ginger and salt into a large mixing bowl.
  2. Rub in the cubed butter until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.
  3. Mix the egg yolk into the water and add into the flour mixture, stirring with your hands until the mixture just comes together as a dough. Add olive oil if the dough is a little dry. Wrap the pastry in cling film and set aside in the fridge for 20-30 minutes.
  4. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.
  5. Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface to the thickness of a pound coin.
  6. Drape the dough over the rolling pin and use it to transfer the pastry to a 30cm/12in tart case. Press the pastry into the tin, ensuring there are no gaps in the corner. Allow the excess pastry to overhang the tin.
  7. Cover with clingfilm and chill for 20 minutes.
  8. Prick the bottom of the pastry case with a fork. Line the case with baking paper and weigh it down with baking beans, rice or lentils.
  9. Bake blind for 15 minutes, then remove the baking beans and paper and bake for a further 5-10 minutes. Set aside to cool on a rack.
  10. Reduce the oven temperature to 170C/325F/Gas 3.
  11. For the lime filling, in a large mixing bowl whisk together the condensed milk with the lime juice, lime zest, egg yolks until the mixture thickens. Stir in the chopped stem ginger. Taste the filling, and fold in some icing sugar, if needed.
  12. Pour mixture into the pie crust, smooth the top with a palette knife and bake for 15-20 minutes. The pie is ready when the filling has a slight wobble or when the temperature in the centre has reached 70C when checked with a probe thermometer.
  13. Set aside to cool for half an hour in the baking tin, then chill the pie in a refrigerator for as long as possible.
  14. Place the sugar in a heavy-based deep saucepan with six tablespoons water over a medium heat. Bring the mixture to the boil without stirring, brushing down any sugar crystals on the side of the pan with a wet pastry brush. Remove the syrup from the heat when it reaches 120C/248F (the firm ball stage).
  15. In a free-standing mixer, whisk the egg whites until stiff peaks form when the whisk is removed.
  16. While whisking, pour the boiling syrup onto the egg whites in a thin, steady stream, being careful not to pour the syrup on to the whisk as it may splash onto your hands.
  17. Continue to whisk the egg whites until the mixture is stiff, shiny and stable.
  18. Place the meringue into a piping bag fitted with a 1.5cm round nozzle.
  19. Once the pie is chilled, sprinkle the reserved lime zest and grated chocolate over the top of the pie.
  20. Pipe the meringue around the edge of the pie in generous swirls.
  21. Using a cook’s blowtorch, gently caramelise the meringue so that the top is light golden-brown.

Elderflower Drizzle Cake

30 Jul

Mum has been making elderflower cordial by the bucketload (ok I exaggerate, but she’s made a fair few bottles!) It is refreshingly summery and as it’s made with home grown elderflower, which tends to have quite a short season, it’s always a bit of a treat. I associate the taste with summer and so far, Britain hasn’t been having such a bad one. IMG_20130728_211617[1]

 

 

 

Anyway, an interesting, summer take on the classic lemon drizzle cake proved to be a hit. We froze half and when thawed, the elderflower had really soaked into the cake and gave it a gorgeous light refreshing taste. A real summer hit, enjoy with a glass of Pimms or champagne if you’re feeling a bit wild.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recipe is from the Guardian IMG_20130728_213053[1]

Serves 6-8

225g butter, softened
225g caster sugar
4 large eggs
225g self raising flour, sifted

For the icing
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
100ml elderflower cordial
2 tbsp sugar

1 Line a loaf tin with baking parchment. Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. In a large mixing bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, then beat in the eggs one by one. Incorporate the flour and mix well, until smooth and creamy.

Turn into the prepared loaf tin and bake for 40-45 minutes, until well-risen and golden brown on top.

3 Leave to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then prick all over with a skewer or fork.

4 Heat the elderflower cordial, lemon juice and sugar in a pan until hot, but not boiling. Drizzle over the cake, encouraging it to run into the sink holes. It should sink in and leave a crunchy crust.

IMG_20130728_212925[1]

Strawberries & Cream Victoria Sandwich

14 Jul

IMG_20130714_150517[1]Strawberries are in season at the moment and along with the brilliant weather we seem to be experiencing here in the UK (even Wild West Wales is hot and dry, amazingly) they are in abundance and for once not about £4 for a punnet of tasteless watery stawbs.

Tesco got on the Wimbledon bandwagon and were selling punnets of British strawberries with ‘free’ pots of double cream.

Cream is such a treat (I once knew someone who ate a whole pot for their dinner, with nothing else out of guilt) and a perfect combination is with freshly whipped cream, in a classic Victoria sponge eaten outside with a glass of homemade (I need to get my mums recipe for this up!) elderflower cordial. How sophisticated eh!

 

 

IMG_20130714_150308[1]

 

The cake was made from the River Cottage’s recipe
Ingredients:
175g self raising flour
pinch of salt
175g unsalted butter, softened and cubed
175g caster sugar
3 eggs, lightly beaten
1tsp vanilla extract (optional)
1 med pot of double cream
punnet of strawberries, washed
2 X 20cm sandwich tins

Method:
1. Preheat oven to 180C. Beat the butter to a cream, then add the sugar and beat until very light and creamy (this is the secret to a great sponge!)
2. Add the eggs, a little at a time in conjunction with a spoon or two of the flour to prevent curdling, beating thoroughly after each addition. Add the vanilla extract if using.
3. Sift in the rest of the flour and carefully fold it in. Divide the mixture evenly between the two sandwich tins and bake for around 25mins or until springy when gently pushed.
4. When cooked, leave in the tins for a few minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
5. When the cake is cooled, whip the cream until stiff, slice the strawberries and spread the cream over one layer, and top with thinly sliced strawberries. Top with the other layer and arrange strawberry halves on top. Dust with icing sugar!IMG_20130714_150431[1]

IMG_20130714_150347[1]

Strawberry Cream Tea – one of those things that everyone loves

17 Jun

I finally arrived home in West Wales after over two weeks of dashing (and even flying, seriously) over the country from Exeter, Bristol and Cardiff to London and Newcastle. I’m not going to lie, it mostly involved partying, eating tasty meals, socilaising and lying in bed all morning with friends laughing about the previous nights escapades (tough life, I know.)

CYMERA_20130616_172135

IMG_20130616_171705

 

I was very much looking forward to coming back home for a few days and what I was greeted home with was amazing. Mums are great. They bake fresh scones and serve great tea, although my Dad is bound to comment if I don’t include that he was the one who came up with the idea of using deliciously sweet in season strawberries; instead of jam to go with the clotted cream on the scones (it was a great change – definitely recommend it!)

My Mum has a wonderful baking book by Jane Asher, which is where she got the scone recipe from. After trying many others, this is her fave and I wholeheartedly agree.

Serve on a lovely table with some flowers, tea in proper tea cups and saucers, you can’t go wrong.

I’m looking forward to Welsh Cakes and Bara Brith next time (hint hint) 😀

IMG_20130616_171950

IMG_20130616_171839

A proper Victoria Sponge 21st Birthday Cake (none of that French mousse and fruit rubbish)

10 Apr

One of my friends posted on my Facebook wall on my birthday wishing me a Happy Birthday and hoping that I get the chance to eat a proper, good old British sponge cake. There was no need to worry I tell you what, Mary Berry would be proud of my Mum’s effort transporting my cake through 3 countries to reach me here in Nice, still fresh and a delicious slice of Victoria Sponge (with a twist…) loveliness.

My mum used to always make my birthday cake topped with a ‘horse scene’ (yes, I am a horse girl) I love how, now that I am 21, she thought it was about time I recieved a more grown up cake.

The result – an impressive British Festival scene, complete with porta loos and muddy wellies.

Pretty great eh!Image

IMG_20130408_183233

A hankering for Hot Cross Buns (the French don’t do them)

31 Mar

Hot Cross Buns are ALWAYS present in my house (uni or at home – my mum makes some great ones, albeit with the help of the breadmaker…) over Easter time. They make a healthy breakfast or teatime treat with the low amount of fat in the dough, you can have them toasted slathered in butter and jam, or they are pretty tasty on their own, warm out of the oven.

Although not immediately out the oven… greedy me burnt my hands/lips and learned my lesson…IMG_20130331_163950

Anyway, I decided to tackle making my own this year, after sneakily downloading (IPlayer has me coming across ‘content unavailable outside the UK’ notifications whenever I see a programme that I want to watch and I ALWAYS forget in my excitement) the Great British Bake off’s Eater Masterclass, I attempted Paul Hollywoods recipe. They seemed pretty simple?! (She says, forgetting that he is a professional baker and herself a more chuck-in-a-bowl-and-stir kinda baker) But yes, they were really easy to make, a little time consuming with two 1hour rises but it’s something you have to expect. I actually like having my afternoon being taken up by baking, I always feel productive (even if I am meant to be doing that French translation but tant pis!)

I have my looooovely friends coming to visit on Easter Monday, I hope they like them 😉

Ingredients:
300ml milk
50g butter
500g strong bread flour
1 tsp salt
75g caster sugar
7g sachet fast-action or easy-blend yeast
1 egg, beaten
75g sultanas
50g mixed peel
zest 1 orange
1 apple, peeled, cored and finely chopped
1 tsp ground cinnamon
70g flour/2 tbsp water (for the cross!
1tbsp apricot jam mixed with ½ tbsp water (for the glaze)

IMG_20130331_164313

Method:

1. Bring the milk to the boil, then remove from the heat and add the butter. Leave to cool until it reaches hand temperature. Tip the flour, salt, sugar and yeast into a bowl. Pour in the warm milk and butter mixture into a well in the centre and add the egg. Mix well with a wooden spoon. Add the mixed peel, spices, orange zest and sultanas.

2. Knead for 5 minutes on a well floured surface until the dough starts to come together, you may need to add more flour, but don’t add too much – kneading will help the dough lose its ‘stickyness’. Put the dough in a slightly oiled bowl and leave in a warm place to rise for an hour.

3. When the dough is at least doubled in size, knock out and knead again for 5 minutes until elastic. The dough should smell erm-aahh-zing right now.

4. Divide into around 15 equal sized balls and arrange on a baking sheet, with a gap either side to allow for rising. Leave to rise in a warm place for another hour. Before baking, mix the water/flour together to make the cross, the mixture should be a consistency that drops off a spoon and is easily pipeable but still holds it shape. Pop into a piping bag and get crossing!
5. Bake for about 12 minutes in an oven preheated to 200C, then glaze with a pastry brush the warmed, mixed water & jam for a really professional finish.