Tag Archives: Exeter

Urban Burger – Exeter

9 Aug

image

It was the last Sunday of grad week. I’d frequented the grad ball the previous night. It was 2pm Sunday and I had not eaten anything yet. Hunger was raging.

 

I was craving some carby, salty yet healthy-ish food (yes I am a weird hungover) and thought a great bet would be a relatively new restaurant to Exeter – Urban Burger. I’d been before which…  was a weird experience. Ollie and I were the only ones in the restaurant, which I know didn’t set the ambiance off, however we were surrounded by very clichéd fake 90’s graffiti decor, whilst smooth jazz echoed through the restaurant. We didn’t hang about. Nonetheless  the food was pretty good! We both agreed a takeaway would be better – especially with a great 15% discount on eat-in prices.

 

I opted for the ‘Aphrodite’ (God knows about the name) wrap hit the spot –  Grilled Halloumi, rocket, tomato, red onion, hummus, grilled peppers, courgette, aubergine, Tzatziki. deee-lish.

 

Advertisements

A bit more than just sausages and mash

28 Nov

In fact – it’s actually grilled sausages with sautéed leek comté cheese mash with a hint of whole grain mustard and sweetcorn, served with proper onion and red wine gravy. Proper British winter food – a perfect use of my precious vegetarian sausages I managed to stuff into my hand luggage on my way back from Exeter last week!

This dish calls for quite a few elements but it is really easy. It is a ‘sausage and mash’ dish that is even fancy enough for a dinner party. I always think that mashed potato sometimes need an extra few elements to make it a bit more exciting, this is the perfect comfort food combination (or hangover cure…) We had our mammoth plates after I had come home from work looking like a soggy drowned rat after one of Nice’s sudden storms.
These are big portions so if you haven’t got a huge appetite, make some fried potato cakes with any leftover mash the following day (for that reason I actually regret being a greedy pig and eating it all – 3 whole potatoes each plus half a leek…oh dear.)
DISCLAIMER: A food coma may occur, you have been warned.

Serves 2 adults with eyes bigger than their stomachs.
Ingredients:
4 sausages (vegetarian or good quality pork)
For the mash:
650g potatoes
1 medium leek
50g tinned sweetcorn
60g grated comté or mature cheddar cheese
1 tbsp whole grain mustard
1tbsp milk
salt and pepper
For the gravy:
A good knob of butter
100ml red wine, cheapest quality will suffice – ours was just over 1euro, not really fit for consumption but perfect for cooking.
1 small onion, peeled, halved and finely chopped.
2tsp whole grain mustard
1tsp tomato puree (we used ketchup!)
1.5tbsp plain flour
100ml vegetable or beef stock (we found vegetable stock to be plenty rich enough.)
Salt and pepper

Method:


 1. Cook onion in butter for 2-3min without colouring. Add flour and stir on the hat for 1 min. Add the tomato puree & mustard. Gradually stir in the wine then the stock, ensuring there are no lumps. Bring to the boil then simmer gently for 30minutes or until desired consistency is reached. Season to taste.
2. Whilst the sauce is boiling, chop up your potatoes into quarters and add them to a salted pan of boiling water to boil for about 15 minutes, until soft but not crumbling. I prefer not to peel my potatoes as I like the texture of the potato skin in the mash.

3. When your potatoes are just starting to boil, in a separate frying pan, sauté your chopped leek in a good knob of butter on a medium heat. They should be soft and not burned within 10 minutes. Try to use all of a leek – including the majority of the green part.
4. Grill your sausages on a medium heat for around 15 minutes. Brush them with oil and place them on a shelf where they will not sit in their own fat. Remember to turn your sausages every 3/4 minutes. They will take around 12-15 minutes to cook. Grilling is always the healthiest/tastiest way to cook sausages.
5. Drain your potatoes and return them to the pan on a very low heat to dry out before mashing.
6. Add a good knob of butter to the potatoes and the milk. Mash in the saucepan until you have your desired ‘mashedness’. Season. Mix in the mustard and then add the leeks, sweetcorn and cheese and combine. The cheese should start to melt and you will want to just scoop it out of the pan then and there to eat.
7. On warmed plates, add a good few dollops of mash, your sausages and your gravy.

Eat, then have a good sleep.

Soaked coffee and walnut cake

27 Nov

Coffee and walnut is one of my all time favourite cakes. Delia Smith’s ‘Austrian coffee and walnut cake’ has the best recipe I have tried. What makes it so tasty is that as soon as the cake is taken out of the oven, coffee syrup is poured over to soak into the cake, giving it an amazingly moist, coffee enriched flavour and texture. In theory it should be baked in two sandwich tins, with each cake having a share of the coffee, meaning that you get the syrupy loveliness in two cakes. However, as I only have a loaf tin, the bottom two thirds of the cake was comparably a lot drier to two sandwich tin cakes soaked in syrup. I used my own buttercream recipe that is simple and can be made with everyday storecuboard ingredients.
I served this as part of my Exeter-inspired afternoon tea with some friends in Nice. My parents visited and also had a few slices – a proper ‘feed a crowd’ cake!

TIP: If you are using a loaf tin, it’s tempting to make more syrup to allow the bottom half of the cake to complement from it, however do not do this as it would give your cake a soggy top!

Serves 8
Ingredients:
For the cake –
1 ½ level tablespoons instant coffee mixed with 2 tablespoons boiling water
75g walnut halves
175g self raising flour
1 ½ level teaspoons baking powder
175g softened butter
175g caster sugar
3 eggs

For the syrup –
1 level tablespoon instant coffee
50g Demerara sugar (I used caster as I had nothing else and worked perfectly)

For the coffee buttercream –
125g softened butter (I prefer to use salted – I find it gives a richer taste)
200g icing sugar

1 dessert spoon instant coffee dissolved with 1 ½ tablespoons boiling water.

Method:
1. Preheat your oven to 170C (fan). Reserving a few for decoration, roughly break up your walnut halves and spread them on a baking tray. Toast in the oven for around 8 minutes. Set aside.
2. Meanwhile, sieve your flour and baking powder into a large mixing bowl. Then, simply add all the other ingredients apart from the coffee and walnuts and mix together with a wooden spoon or use an electric whisk so all of the ingredients are well combined and the mixture drops off a wooden spoon when tapped against the side of the bowl.
3. Fold in the coffee mixture and walnuts. Divide the mixture between 2 greased sandwich tins with the bottoms lined with baking paper. If you do not have sandwich tins, a loaf tin will do providing it is well greased. Pop into the oven for 30minutes or so (for sandwich tins) or around 45 minutes (for a loaf tin) until a skewer comes out of the middle of the cake clean.
4. Whilst the cake is baking, make the coffee syrup by placing the coffee and sugar into a heatproof jug. Add 55ml boiling water and stir briskly until the coffee and sugar is dissolved.
5. When the cakes are cooked, leave to cool for 5 minutes then remove from tins and place on a wire rack to cool. Pour the syrup equally over each cake whilst the cakes are still warm so the syrup is absorbed better.
6. When the cakes are cooled, spread with a good slathering of buttercream and decorate with the remaining walnut halves. To make the buttercream you simply mix together the softened butter with sieved icing sugar added a little at a time. When all the icing sugar has been added, dissolve the instant coffee in the boiling water. You should have a strong, syrupy coffee. Mix this into the buttercream and you will have a delicious creamy coffee buttercream. I dare you not to lick the bowl!