Tag Archives: France

Place Garibaldi, giant (raspberry and lychee cream filled!) Macarons and people watching in the sun. Ahhhh.

13 May

Since finishing working in Nice, I have pretty much been on ‘holiday’ here, before I leave in a few weeks to go back to the wet and cold of the UK. I have been making the most of my time, dividing it up between eating ice cream, going to cafes and people watching, drinking wine, eating patisserie, going to the beach… tough life really isn’t it?

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So anyway, I was recommended by a French friend a place called Deli Bo – a trendy hipster hangout serving lunches, coffees and AMAZING patisseries! I subsequently headed there, picked up a Lychee and Rasberry Giant Macaron and headed to one of the many cafes in Place Garibaldi (my fave place to chill, attempt to read my French magazines, and people watch) to eat it, away from the waiters gaze of course, along with a noisette (a bargain of a coffee – an espresso with a bit of frothy milk – no more than 2 Euros in any French cafe.)

‘Twas delish and so thought I would gloat about how amazing it was with pictures and a blog post here 😀Image

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When in France… Tarte Tatin (upside down caramelised apple tart)

11 Mar

This weekend, I was craving to bake something simple, tasty and satisfying, which doesn’t call for loads of ingredients (and money… I was feeling very pro-student-budgeting after looking at my bank account!)

Of course, I am in France, home of amazing patisserie. As they say, when in France, make a Tarte Tatin (I’m sure that’s not a phrase but yeah, whatever.) Image

The Tarte Tatin was originally made by accident, which is quite lucky for us. I find the caramalised apples so much better than traditional English-style apple pies, which also seem to be more pastry that anything else.

Once more, it gave me the excuse to use my amazing Great British Bake Off book! Slightly adapted… I didn’t particularly fancy tackling home made puff pastry!

It’s also amazing warm, with salted caramel and pecan ice cream (I have a constant supply in my freezer, naughty.)

Serves 6-8

200g all butter puff pastry
150g golden granulated sugar
600g eating apples
6tbsp water

Method:
1. Put the sugar and water into a saucepan and warm on a medium heat until the sugar is dissolved. Turn up the heat slightly and boil to make a caramel, gently tipping the pan  backwards and forwards now and again (don’t stir!) When the caramel is golden brown, put the saucepan into a bowl of cold water to stop the cooking process and burnt caramel!
2. Core and slice apples, but leave the skins on. Pour the caramel into a lined 20cm tart or cake tin with a fixed bottom (otherwis
e your caramel will drip through the bottom!)
3. Arrange the apple slices on top of the caramel.
4. Roll out your pastry to a disk, drape over the apples and tuck in the edges of the disk down to the bottom of the tin. Cut a small cross in the middle of the pastry.
5. Cook in a pre-heated oven at 200C for 30mins or until pastry is golden brown.
6. When cooked, place a large plate over the pastry then carefully flip the tart so the tasty caramelised apples are revealed and subsequently ready to be eaten with lots of ice cream/cream/custard…. (or all three..)

Nutella, crêpes, emmental and ham – Shrove Tuesday the French way

13 Feb

France has its ‘pancake day’ on the 2nd of February, known as the Fête de la Chandeleur.

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Unbeknownst to me, the 12th of February mardi gras doesn’t involve pancakes. It literally means ‘fat Tuesday’, yet it does not involve pancakes and their delicious if a little naughty (when else do we have ice cream and chocolate for dinner?!) toppings… hmm.

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I wish I had known about the Fête de la Chandeleur earlier, as I then would have had two excuses to eat pancakes all day. Oh well, I suppose I had my fair share of them last night (and this morning…)

For our pancake party, everyone brought a batter ingredient and a topping. We had such a great selection from French classics such as Nutella and banana crepes as well as emmental and ham. We also had Speculoos spread and banana (cinnamon coffee biscuits in a spread… the French love it!) to melted Lindt chocolate and strawberries topped with ice cream, Greek yogurt and fresh rhubarb and raspberry compote, to British classics such as lemon and sugar. And of course, fluffy American pancakes with butter and maple syrup!

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Yum Yum Yum!

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Simple pleasures – Sunday morning croissants & hot chocolate à la français/Phoebe

3 Feb

During my walk home from the nightbus after a night out in Cannes, I found myself walking past my local boulangerie. Late night to the early hours of the morning is when all croissboulangeries make their masses of breads and pastries. The smell of fresh bread is infamously amazing, however the wafts of baking croissants I believe is even better. I went to bed adamant to treat myself to a croissant in the morning. I also realised that I am actually quite obsessed with food – who plans their breakfast so determinedly (I even checked to see if I had apricot jam…) at 4am whilst knackered and (slightly) under the influence of alcohol?!

True to late night determination, two fresh, buttery croissants made their way to  my apartment. As it’s a Sunday, I thought why not go all out and have a typical French, tasty yet not so healthy accompaniment – hot chocolate in a bowl, the only way to drink it (if you are a French child, but oh well.)

As an adult, I did make myself a bit more of a ‘grown-up’ hot chocolate in a bowl. The addition of a shot of coffee makes masses of difference in my opinion. It takes away some of the sicklyness that can come from a big bowl of milky hot chocolate, plus gives you a bit of a (much needed) caffeine buzz.

Just what I needed!

My version of chocolate chaud calls for:
A china, heat proof smallish bowl that can easlily be drunk from.
About 250ml milk (if you are going really authentic then use UHT – although the French stuff doesn’t have quite the same strong taste as the UHT milk in the UK.)
1 tbsp hot chocolate powder (Poulain is a popular French brand that is the best – far better than any supermarket hot chocolate in the UK, I always bring a pot back with me!)
Shot of espresso or 2tsp instant coffee granules

1. In your bowl, mix the coffee and hot chocolate powder with a few tbsp milk to form a paste, add the rest of the milk then pop in the microwave for 1min. Stir to ensure everything is well mixed and cook for a further 40seconds.
Serve with warm croissants and jam.

 

Skiing fuel and mountain food, Isola 2000, Alpes-Maritimes

29 Jan

Last weekend I took my first ever ski trip to Isola 2000, a mere 2 hour bus journey from Nice.

club montagneAs the resort is so close and fares are incredibly cheap it seemed silly not to take up the opportunity to learn to ski. I was doubtful of how everyone seems to rave about how ‘amazing skiing is oh my god you have to go!’ after spending the Saturday hurtling down a mountain unable to stop or turn, shouting ‘PAAARDDOOOON’ to innocent bystanders. Sunday however changed my outlook from being scared and a bit confused to how people enjoying feeling completely out of control speeding down a mountain on two sticks. The technique of shifting weight to turn and stop finally clicked and I spend an amazing (in control!) day skiing down the green runs, relaxing and really enjoying myself (simple pleasure, I know.)

The combination of the spectacular landscapes, blue skies, peaceful silence from the snow, the adrenalin of carving up a mountain, chocolate chaud breaks and of course the wooden mountain-side restaurants complete with log fires has got me hooked.

Skiing and the fresh mountain air really builds up your appetite! For one lunch I fueled up on fresh, wood-fired pizza whilst sitting outside watching people ski pass. For my other lunch I opted for a ‘club sandwich de montagne’ a rustic ancienne baguette stuffed with tomatoes, spinach, gherkins and reblochon – a soft, slightly nutty, strongly flavoured sheep cheese which is a specialty of the Alps.

In every restaurant there were ‘spécialités de montagne’ (literally – specialties of the mountain) which included infamous raclette – a semi-wheel of cheese which is slowly melted and scraped off to cover potatoes, gherkins and varieties of cured meats. It is perfect wintery warming food. I did not have any this time round but when I next go skiing it is on the menu!

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thirdyearabroad.com article – eating, cooking and staying healthy!

23 Jan

http://www.thirdyearabroad.com/home/item/1417-eating-local-produce-staying-healthy-budgeting.html

I’ve been writing for Third Year Abroad a few times this year. My latest article is food and travel related therefore I thought it would be suitable to share it with everyone on here 🙂

Hope you enjoy it!